When the Path Reveals Itself: Driftwood Beach, Jekyll Island

When the Path Reveals Itself: Driftwood Beach, Jekyll Island

“When the path reveals itself, follow it” is a quote from Cheryl Strayed’s book of quotes Brave Enough. Admittedly, I’m a sucker for a good quote, but this one resonated with me. Although the words first hit me as revelatory, I realize that following paths is exactly what I’ve been doing my entire life, and it’s been a beautiful, difficult, messy, grand journey. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. If you have not read Strayed’s Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, you’re missing out. It is about love, loss, the choices we make, and never

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Review: CineBistro – Waverly Place (Cary NC)

I had the pleasure of attending a dress rehearsal for the newest CineBistro location at Waverly Place in Cary. Many thanks to Tara Mead Schaup, Event Manager, for coordinating an evening of cocktails, great food, and previews. I attended as a guest of a guest and was not compensated for writing about my experience. As always, this review is my honest opinion. CineBistro is a movie theater with in-theater dining, a full-service bar, and a lounge. If any of you are thinking, ‘I know what this is, I’ve been to Raleighwood,’ stop right now. I’m not here to pick on the

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Book Review: Barefoot to Avalon by David Payne (North Carolina Author)

Barefoot to Avalon, a Brother’s Story, is David Payne’s sixth published book and memoir that is insightful, raw, and gut-wrenching. It’s the story of an unconventional childhood and a dysfunctional family whelmed by tragedy. Barefoot to Avalon focuses on the violent death of David’s brother, George A., and the years and moments leading up to the horrific accident—a familial thread of resentment and feelings not communicated. Feelings not spoken just hours before George A.’s death, which David witnessed. Their father pitted the two against one another since childhood, while their mother did nothing to mitigate. David’s brother lived with mental

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April Book Challenge 2015

I’ve been up to something. I participated in a bookish photo-a-day challenge on Instagram. What’s this, you ask? Well, a calendar was posted listing a particular type of book or a book + something, etc. for each day, and the idea was to share a photo of said books/items. My friend Julie at MyBookRetreat put the challenge out there, and it was hosted by @msbooklover and @crochetandbooks. The tags were #AprilBookChallenge2015 and #SpringTimeReaders, and, of course, I was in! I jumped in this thing spur of the moment (imagine that) because it’s been a while since I’ve tried anything new or outside my proverbial,

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Book Review: All the Light We Cannot See

Set during World War II, this novel delicately and seamlessly weaves the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner together in a way that is spellbinding. The story of Marie-Laure LeBlanc, the much adored blind daughter of a French museum locksmith, and Werner Pfennig, a brilliant orphan turned German soldier, is a story of wonder, self-preservation, love, and the human desire for redemption. Marie-Laure was a young child when she lost her sight, and only 12 when she and her father fled Paris to live obscurely in the French countryside with an agoraphobic uncle until the war ended. Marie-Laure did not know of

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